Economic and Empowerment Impacts of Millet Processing and Value
Addition Enterprises by Women SHGs in Tribal Areas of Odisha

Collaborators

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About Programme

Engaging the poor in livelihood programs through women self-help groups (SHGs) is a widely used strategy by state governments and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in India. However, these projects have typically not been implemented in such a way as to facilitate a rigorous evaluation of their impacts. Given the societal and developmental importance of these livelihood initiatives, and given the significant public investments to support them, this knowledge gap is of great importance.

Programme
Duration

Starting date: 7 April 2021
Ending date: 31 January 2024

2
Year
9
Months
24
Days

Research Components

Technical support to postharvest and processing of millets

Value addition through new product development

Enterprise development support

Gender-responsive training and capacity building

Innovation and nutrition profiling and market linkage. Research questions

Theory of Change

The impact pathway and planned theory of change of our project are presented in Figure 1 (attached). The key question we will ask is: Does millet processing improve (a) household income (especially among women), (b) women's empowerment and contributions to household decision making, (c) household health, education, and nutrition outcomes? The impact pathway diagram links actual needs to programmatic inputs, expected outputs, outcomes, and long-term impacts. The principal problem is the existing gender gap in entrepreneurship and lack of quality employment for women. This creates the need for a woman-focused and group-based microenterprise. The millet processing intervention with the SHGs aims to increase business volume to make the enterprise viable for many value chain actors.

Knowledge Gap

We see a critical knowledge gap in determining whether and to what extent millet processing enterprises can improve women's decision-making authority within the household and other household welfare such as income, nutrition, child education, etc. Engaging the poor in livelihood programs through women SHGs is a widely used strategy by governments and NGOs in India. However, these projects have typically not been implemented in such a way as to facilitate a rigorous evaluation of their impacts. Both SHGs and millet enterprises are women-centric activities and based on women collectives. Although women collectives bring social capital it is not very clear if the capacity of SHGs is a factor for a successful enterprise.

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Our Team

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Dr Apurbha Shee

NRI, Greenwich University
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Dr Zaki Wahhaj

Kent University
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Dr Manoj Dora

Brunel University
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A. Ravindra

WASSAN
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Jitendra Kar

WASSAN
Funded By # & #